Thursday, February 06, 2014

How to install MySQL 5.5.x in CentOS 6.4

In CentOS, packages in the default repository are stable, but old. Sometimes we want to install newer version of a package, you have to ways: install from srouce or add extra repository. This tutorial shows you how to install MySQL 5.5.x from yum by adding extra repository.

Check existing mysql version:
# yum info mysql
Available Packages
Name        : mysql
Arch        : x86_64
Version     : 5.1.71
Release     : 1.el6
Size        : 893 k
Repo        : base
Summary     : MySQL client programs and shared libraries
URL         : http://www.mysql.com
License     : GPLv2 with exceptions
Description : MySQL is a multi-user, multi-threaded SQL database server. MySQL is a
            : client/server implementation consisting of a server daemon (mysqld)
            : and many different client programs and libraries. The base package
            : contains the standard MySQL client programs and generic MySQL files.

So in default repository, the MySQL version is 5.1.71.

Let's Add extra repository:
There are a few popular repository for CentOS like bellow.
  • epel - Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux, epel is a Fedora Special Interest Group that creates, maintains and manages a high quality set of additional packages for Enterprise Linux.
  • remi - The Remi repository is a repository containing updated PHP and MySQL packages and is maintained by Remi.
  • rpmforge - RepoForge is the new RPMforge. The RepoForge project maintains RPM packages for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), CentOS and Scientific Linux.

Install epel, remi and rpmforge:
# rpm -Uvh http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm
# rpm -Uvh http://rpms.famillecollet.com/enterprise/remi-release-6.rpm
# rpm -Uvh http://pkgs.repoforge.org/rpmforge-release/rpmforge-release-0.5.3-1.el6.rf.x86_64.rpm

Check repository:
# yum repolist
repo id                                   repo name                                           status
base                                   CentOS-6 - Base                                        6,367
cloudera-manager                       Cloudera Manager, Version 4.8.0                        6
epel                                   Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux 6 - x86_64         10,440
extras                                 CentOS-6 - Extras                                      14
rpmforge                               RHEL 6 - RPMforge.net - dag                            4,650
updates                                CentOS-6 - Updates                                     463

Enable repository:
# vi /etc/yum.repos.d/epel.repo
# vi /etc/yum.repos.d/remi.repo
# vi /etc/yum.repos.d/rpmforge.repo
change
enabled=0 to enabled=1

Now check MySQL version again:
# yum --enablerepo=epel,remi,rpmforge info mysql
Available Packages
Name        : mysql
Arch        : x86_64
Version     : 5.5.36
Release     : 1.el6.remi
Size        : 5.8 M
Repo        : remi
Summary     : MySQL client programs and shared libraries
URL         : http://www.mysql.com
License     : GPLv2 with exceptions and LGPLv2 and BSD
Description : MySQL is a multi-user, multi-threaded SQL database server. MySQL is a
            : client/server implementation consisting of a server daemon (mysqld)
            : and many different client programs and libraries. The base package
            : contains the standard MySQL client programs and generic MySQL files.

Install MySQL 5.5.36:
# yum --enablerepo=epel,remi,rpmforge install mysql-server mysql-devel

Start mysql service:
# service mysqld start
Initializing MySQL database:  Installing MySQL system tables...
OK
Filling help tables...
OK

To start mysqld at boot time you have to copy
support-files/mysql.server to the right place for your system

PLEASE REMEMBER TO SET A PASSWORD FOR THE MySQL root USER !
To do so, start the server, then issue the following commands:

/usr/bin/mysqladmin -u root password 'new-password'
/usr/bin/mysqladmin -u root -h rtlnn2.retailigence.com password 'new-password'

Alternatively you can run:
/usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation

which will also give you the option of removing the test
databases and anonymous user created by default.  This is
strongly recommended for production servers.

See the manual for more instructions.

You can start the MySQL daemon with:
cd /usr ; /usr/bin/mysqld_safe &

You can test the MySQL daemon with mysql-test-run.pl
cd /usr/mysql-test ; perl mysql-test-run.pl

Please report any problems at http://bugs.mysql.com/
                                                           [  OK  ]
Starting mysqld:                                           [  OK  ]

Set password for root:
# mysql_secure_installation
NOTE: RUNNING ALL PARTS OF THIS SCRIPT IS RECOMMENDED FOR ALL MySQL
      SERVERS IN PRODUCTION USE!  PLEASE READ EACH STEP CAREFULLY!

In order to log into MySQL to secure it, we'll need the current
password for the root user.  If you've just installed MySQL, and
you haven't set the root password yet, the password will be blank,
so you should just press enter here.

Enter current password for root (enter for none):
OK, successfully used password, moving on...

Setting the root password ensures that nobody can log into the MySQL
root user without the proper authorisation.

Set root password? [Y/n] Y
New password:
Re-enter new password:
Password updated successfully!
Reloading privilege tables..
 ... Success!

Remove anonymous users? [Y/n] Y
 ... Success!

Disallow root login remotely? [Y/n] Y
 ... Success!

Remove test database and access to it? [Y/n] n
 ... skipping.

Reload privilege tables now? [Y/n] Y
 ... Success!

Cleaning up...
All done!

Test mysql:
# mysql -u root -p
Enter password:
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 8
Server version: 5.5.36 MySQL Community Server (GPL) by Remi
Copyright (c) 2000, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
owners.

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.

mysql> exit

Configure mysql process to start at system boot time:
# chkconfig --list | grep mysqld
mysqld          0:off 1:off 2:off 3:off 4:off 5:off 6:off
# chkconfig --level 345 mysqld on
# chkconfig --list | grep mysqld
mysqld         0:off 1:off 2:off 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off

You are all set.

3 comments:

Ulf Lundqvist said...

Hi! and thanks for a great guide. What happens to my existing settings and databases? I've made a sqldump for all databases and made a backup of my.cnf. Should I be considered something else?

Tony Xu said...

Hi Ulf:

I would also backup all directories/paths defined in my.cnf, for example "/var/lib/mysql". Normally "my.cnf" and a full mysql dump will be sufficient but it doesn't hurt to backup extra paths.

Ulf Lundqvist said...

My upgrade worked without problems! (of course with the yum -update syntax instead of -install).